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Locksmith Trivia (Locksmith Basics)

Locksmith Trivia (Locksmith Basics)

Grab and drink your ice-cold Topo Chico as we take a look at the post of the week, comment of the week, and some locksmith trivia. Also, check out our new lock-out water bottle, a free one over $475. Let's go and get this party started.

POST OF THE WEEK

The post of the week is from Ed M. Ed; thanks for sending that. I agree with you 100%. We all start at different spots with different budgets, skills, and backgrounds, and, you know, we should never be ashamed of where we started or how we started. Start where you are with the budget, and then build on it. I love the feedback, love the advice.

We got one more. As soon as I saw this, I didn't know about you guys, but I was like, "Connor, are you being mean to Grandma's? What's going on here?" But it is pretty funny. The meme is based on the video we did a week ago about "No-shows." I hope you guys like it as much as I did. I thought it was funny. Now, remember, I don't see this stuff until it goes live. Now, of course, I could look in the backend system, but it's more fun to see them as they come. So good job once again to the social team. Man, you guys are doing great.

 

COMMENT OF THE WEEK

I'm guessing you're probably talking about some older Nissan BCM or the Chrysler. I replied to this comment; "the short answer that is more true than untrue is NASTF." So that's usually the case. Now, if it's older, like a 2000 Chrysler or so, the programmer will not do it; you have to pull out the skin module and play a little doctor-patient with it to get that information. So, it's what it is, but for the most part, if it's not one of those older Chrysler's, and your programmer says it can pull the pin but is not typically NASTF. But hopefully, that helps. For anyone else out there, put your feedback in there. If you agree, I have a different opinion. It's good to get as much knowledge as possible in the comments. It's honestly one of my favorite things to look through there, the people that keep on contributing and commenting. It is excellent; thank you, guys.

LOCKSMITH TRIVIA

Get a pen and pad to keep track of the score. Because once again, I want to know your scores. There will be five randomly picked questions; let's see how you do—rooting for everybody to get three out of five or five. If you don't, it's okay cause you have learned something. Buckle up.

  1. What is the diameter of the SFIC A2 pin?

 

ANSWER: The diameter of an SFIC A2 lock pin is .108 inches.

  1. Is this latch cylindrical or tubular design?

 

ANSWER: It is a tubular style design latch.

  1. Is A or B used as the shoulder stop in the lock on a Kwikset Titan Lock?

 

ANSWER: B. The B shoulder, the one on the bottom, is when you put the key in; it stops the key and allows the six cuts on the key to be used. On that same key, you could slide it into a KW1, and it's going to use the top side, the A, on a five-pin lock, which stops the key on a five-pin. 

  1. What keyway is this key?

 

ANSWER: The image above is an SC1 key; the keyway is the Schlage C, which is by far-right up top next to the Kwikset keyway for the most popular. So that's the Schlage C.

  1. What brand of a lock is this?

 

The reason I bring this one up is if you go out to a house to rekey it and go to one of the doors, entry door, and garage door, you're like, "Can you see that lock?" Knowing what type of lock is by sight will help you get the house to rekey.

ANSWER: Weiser. That is a Weiser lock, and why is it important? How can you tell? If you look at the knob, you can see that it's a separate piece right on the face there. And how that comes apart is very specific to that, so if you don't know that and you try to take that apart, you're going to have a lot of problems. You can get it apart without a key using the rubber band trick. Check our YouTube channel and look for it. For those of you who have been doing this for a while, the locksny's out there; you know what I'm talking. So this is good stuff. So that's the Weiser knob, and it's good to be able to identify that. This is the older stuff, not the new, smart, quick-change stuff. But the older stuff, you need to recognize that to make sure you can pop that off and get it done.

That's all five questions this week. How many did you get? Hopefully, you got all five out of five, or at least three out of five. Thank you, and we'll see you next time! 

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